COVID-19 pandemic in the United States

COVID-19 pandemic in the United States
COVID-19 pandemic in AlabamaCOVID-19 pandemic in AlaskaCOVID-19 pandemic in ArizonaCOVID-19 pandemic in ArkansasCOVID-19 pandemic in CaliforniaCOVID-19 pandemic in ColoradoCOVID-19 pandemic in ConnecticutCOVID-19 pandemic in Washington, D.C.COVID-19 pandemic in DelawareCOVID-19 pandemic in FloridaCOVID-19 pandemic in GeorgiaCOVID-19 pandemic in HawaiiCOVID-19 pandemic in IdahoCOVID-19 pandemic in IllinoisCOVID-19 pandemic in IndianaCOVID-19 pandemic in IowaCOVID-19 pandemic in KansasCOVID-19 pandemic in KentuckyCOVID-19 pandemic in LouisianaCOVID-19 pandemic in MaineCOVID-19 pandemic in MarylandCOVID-19 pandemic in MassachusettsCOVID-19 pandemic in MichiganCOVID-19 pandemic in MinnesotaCOVID-19 pandemic in MississippiCOVID-19 pandemic in MissouriCOVID-19 pandemic in MontanaCOVID-19 pandemic in NebraskaCOVID-19 pandemic in NevadaCOVID-19 pandemic in New HampshireCOVID-19 pandemic in New JerseyCOVID-19 pandemic in New MexicoCOVID-19 pandemic in New York (state)COVID-19 pandemic in North CarolinaCOVID-19 pandemic in North DakotaCOVID-19 pandemic in OhioCOVID-19 pandemic in OklahomaCOVID-19 pandemic in OregonCOVID-19 pandemic in PennsylvaniaCOVID-19 pandemic in Rhode IslandCOVID-19 pandemic in South CarolinaCOVID-19 pandemic in South DakotaCOVID-19 pandemic in TennesseeCOVID-19 pandemic in TexasCOVID-19 pandemic in UtahCOVID-19 pandemic in VermontCOVID-19 pandemic in VirginiaCOVID-19 pandemic in Washington (state)COVID-19 pandemic in West VirginiaCOVID-19 pandemic in WisconsinCOVID-19 pandemic in WyomingCOVID-19 pandemic in American SamoaCOVID-19 pandemic in GuamCOVID-19 pandemic in the Northern Mariana IslandsCOVID-19 pandemic in Puerto RicoCOVID-19 pandemic in the United States Virgin IslandsCOVID-19 outbreak USA per capita cases map.svg
About this image
COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people by state, as of February 27
COVID-19 rolling 14day Prevalence in the United States by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in the United States by confirmed new infections per 100,000 people (14 days preceding March 6)
  1,000+
  500–1,000
  200–500
  100–200
  50–100
  20–50
  10–20
  0–10
  No confirmed new cases or no/bad data
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationUnited States
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China[1]
Index caseChicago, Illinois (earliest known arrival)[2]
Everett, Washington (first case report)[3]
Arrival dateJanuary 13, 2020[4]
(1 year, 1 month, 3 weeks and 1 day ago)
Confirmed cases
Recovered
Deaths
Fatality rate
Government website
coronavirus.gov

The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). More than 28,900,000 confirmed cases have been reported since January 2020, resulting in more than 524,000 deaths, the most of any country and the ninth-highest per capita.[6][9] The U.S. has nearly a quarter of the world's cases and a fifth of all deaths. More Americans have died from COVID-19 than during World War II.[10] COVID-19 became the third leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2020, behind heart disease and cancer.[11] U.S. life expectancy dropped from 78.8 years in 2019 to 77.8 years in the first half of 2020.[12]

On December 31, 2019, China announced the discovery of a cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan. The first American case was reported on January 20, and President Donald Trump declared the U.S. outbreak a public health emergency on January 31. Restrictions were placed on flights arriving from China,[13][14] but the initial U.S. response to the pandemic was otherwise slow, in terms of preparing the healthcare system, stopping other travel, and testing.[15][16][17][a] Meanwhile, Trump remained optimistic on the future of the coronavirus in the United States.

The first known American deaths occurred in February.[19][b] On March 6, Trump signed the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, which provided $8.3 billion in emergency funding for federal agencies to respond to the outbreak.[20] On March 13, President Trump declared a national emergency.[21] In mid-March, the Trump administration started to purchase large quantities of medical equipment,[22] and in late March, it invoked the Defense Production Act to direct industries to produce medical equipment.[23] By April 17, the federal government approved disaster declarations for all states and territories. By mid-April, cases had been confirmed in all fifty U.S. states, and by November in all inhabited U.S. territories. A second rise in infections began in June 2020, following relaxed restrictions in several states, leading to daily cases surpassing 60,000.[24] A third rise in infections began around mid-October, leading to daily cases reaching over 100,000 by the end of the month.[25][26]

State and local responses to the outbreak have included prohibitions and cancellation of large-scale gatherings (including festivals and sporting events), stay-at-home orders, and school closures.[27] Disproportionate numbers of cases have been observed among Black and Latino populations,[28][29][30] and there were reported incidents of xenophobia and racism against Asian Americans.[31] Clusters of infections and deaths have occurred in many areas.[c]

  1. ^ Sheikh, Knvul; Rabin, Roni Caryn (March 10, 2020). "The Coronavirus: What Scientists Have Learned So Far". The New York Times. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  2. ^ "Coronavirus: the first three months as it happened". Nature. April 22, 2020. doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00154-w. PMID 32152592. S2CID 212652777.
  3. ^ Holshue, Michelle L.; DeBolt, Chas; Lindquist, Scott; Lofy, Kathy H.; Wiesman, John; Bruce, Hollianne; Spitters, Christopher; Ericson, Keith; Wilkerson, Sara; Tural, Ahmet; Diaz, George; Cohn, Amanda; Fox, LeAnne; Patel, Anita; Gerber, Susan I.; Kim, Lindsay; Tong, Suxiang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Lindstrom, Steve; Pallansch, Mark A.; Weldon, William C.; Biggs, Holly M.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Pillai, Satish K. (March 5, 2020). "First Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the United States". New England Journal of Medicine. 382 (10): 929–936. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2001191. PMC 7092802. PMID 32004427.
  4. ^ "Second Travel-related Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Detected in United States". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Second Travel-related Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Detected in United States: The patient returned to the U.S. from Wuhan on January 13, 2020
  5. ^ a b "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Cases in U.S." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated, one day after other sources.
  6. ^ a b c "Coronavirus COVID-19 (2019-nCoV)" (ArcGIS). Johns Hopkins CSSE. Frequently updated.
  7. ^ "Our Data". The COVID Tracking Project. Frequently updated.
  8. ^ "U.S. recovered COVID-19 cases". Worldometer. Frequently updated.
  9. ^ "Mortality Analyses". Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  10. ^ "The U.S. COVID-19 death toll now exceeds 406,000. That's more than the number of Americans who died in WWII". USA Today. January 19, 2021. Retrieved January 30, 2021.
  11. ^ Stobbe, Mike (December 21, 2020). "US deaths in 2020 top 3 million, by far most ever counted". Associated Press. Retrieved December 22, 2020.
  12. ^ Marchione, Marilynn (February 18, 2021). "U.S. Life Expectancy Drops A Year In Pandemic, Most Since WWII". HuffPost. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  13. ^ Aubrey, Allison (January 31, 2020). "Trump Declares Coronavirus A Public Health Emergency And Restricts Travel From China". NPR. Retrieved March 18, 2020. 'Foreign nationals other than immediate family of U.S. citizens and permanent residents who have traveled in China in the last 14 days will be denied entry into United States,' Azar said.
  14. ^ Robertson, Lori (April 15, 2020). "Trump's Snowballing China Travel Claim". FactCheck.org. Retrieved April 29, 2020. ... effective February 2.
  15. ^ Lemire, Jonathan; Miller, Zeke; Colvin, Jill; Alonso-Zaldivar, Ricardo (April 12, 2020). "Signs missed and steps slowed in Trump's pandemic response". Associated Press. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  16. ^ Pilkington, Ed; McCarthy, Tom (March 28, 2020). "The missing six weeks: how Trump failed the biggest test of his life". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  17. ^ Ollstein, Alice Miranda (April 14, 2020). "Trump halts funding to World Health Organization". Politico. ISSN 2381-1595. Wikidata Q104180080. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  18. ^ Whoriskey, Peter; Satija, Neena (March 16, 2020). "How U.S. coronavirus testing stalled: Flawed tests, red tape and resistance to using the millions of tests produced by the WHO". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  19. ^ Cite error: The named reference freqTraveller was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  20. ^ "Trump signs emergency coronavirus package, injecting $8.3 billion into efforts to fight the outbreak". Business Insider. March 6, 2020.
  21. ^ Liptak, Kevin (March 13, 2020). "Trump declares national emergency—and denies responsibility for coronavirus testing failures". CNN. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  22. ^ Biesecker, Michael (April 7, 2020). "US 'wasted' months before preparing for coronavirus pandemic". Associated Press. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  23. ^ Cite error: The named reference WatsonMarch27 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  24. ^ Paige Winfield Cunningham; Paulina Firozi. "The Health 202: The Trump administration is eyeing a new testing strategy for coronavirus, Anthony Fauci says". The Washington Post.
  25. ^ "COVID-19 Cases Are Skyrocketing, But Deaths Are Flat—So Far. These 5 Charts Explain Why". Time. Retrieved February 25, 2021.
  26. ^ Maan, Anurag (October 31, 2020). "U.S. reports world record of more than 100,000 COVID-19 cases in single day". Reuters. Retrieved February 25, 2021.
  27. ^ Deb, Sopan; Cacciola, Scott; Stein, Marc (March 11, 2020). "Sports Leagues Bar Fans and Cancel Games Amid Coronavirus Outbreak". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  28. ^ Godoy, Maria (May 30, 2020). "What Do Coronavirus Racial Disparities Look Like State By State?". NPR.
  29. ^ Karson, Kendall; Scanlan, Quinn (May 22, 2020). "Black Americans and Latinos nearly 3 times as likely to know someone who died of COVID-19: Poll". ABC News.
  30. ^ "States tracking COVID-19 race and ethnicity data". American Medical Association. July 28, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  31. ^ Tavernise, Sabrina; Oppel Jr, Richard A. (March 23, 2020). "Spit On, Yelled At, Attacked: Chinese-Americans Fear for Their Safety". The New York Times. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  32. ^ "COVID-19 Infections And Deaths Are Higher Among Those With Intellectual Disabilities". NPR.org.
  33. ^ "U.S. Navy Policies Battling COVID-19 Rely Heavily On Isolation". NPR.org.


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